Archive for Journalism, Media and Social Media

Opinion | Hong Kong’s Protests Could Be Another Social Media Revolution That Ends in Failure – By Thomas L. Friedman – The New York Times

Thomas L. Friedman

By 

Opinion Columnist

CreditCreditAn Rong Xu for The New York Times

“HONG KONG — Pay attention to Hong Kong. The three months of protests here speak volumes about the state of democracy today — how the human quest for freedom can’t be snuffed out, even by the most powerful autocratic systems, and how hard it is to turn that quest into lasting change in the age of Twitter when everyone is a leader, a follower, a broadcaster and a critic, and compromise becomes nearly impossible.

Yes, Hong Kong reminds us that people — God bless them — have both bodies and souls. And the great mistake that autocrats regularly make is thinking that they can thrive indefinitely by feeding just the first and not the second.

While the Hong Kong protests have been fed by many grievances, including income gaps and shortages of affordable housing, the hot molten lava of this volcano is that many Hong Kongers self-identify as free men and women and they viscerally reject the ruling bargain the Communist Party has imposed on mainland China and would like to impose on Hong Kong: To get rich is glorious, but to speak your mind is dangerous.

Why do Hong Kongers feel compelled to assert their identity as a free people now? It’s because anyone who visited China over the last 30 years knows that it is so much more open today than it was three decades ago — and it is so much more closed today than it was five years ago.”

David Lindsay:  Thomas Friedman is on to something. There are flaws in the piece, which are exposed in the NYT Comments, but his general idea is sound, and disturbing. I worry that the people of Hong Kong are in deep trouble, and hope they negotiate with some care to manage the greedy dragon which is Communist China.

Source: Opinion | Hong Kong’s Protests Could Be Another Social Media Revolution That Ends in Failure – The New York Times

Posted in: China, Hong Kong, Journalism, Media and Social Media, Thomas Friedman

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Mark Zuckerberg Wants Facebook to Emulate WeChat. Can It? – By Li Yuan – The New York Times

“SAN FRANCISCO — As Mark Zuckerberg begins shifting Facebook to private messaging and away from public sharing and open conversations, the vision he has sketched out for the future of social networking already exists — just not in the United States.

Instead, it is a reality in China through a messaging app called WeChat.

Developed by the Chinese internet giant Tencent in 2011, WeChat lets people message each other via one-on-one texts, audio or video calls. Users can also form groups of as many as 500 people on WeChat to discuss and debate the issues of the day.

While Facebook users constantly see ads in their News Feeds, WeChat users only see one or two ads a day in their Moment feeds. That’s because WeChat isn’t dependent on advertising for making money. It has a mobile payments system that has been widely adopted in China, which allows people to shop, play games, pay utility bills and order meal deliveries all from within the app. WeChat gets a commission from many of these services.

“WeChat has shown definitively that private messaging, especially the small groups, is the future,” said Jeffrey Towson, a professor of investment at Peking University. “It is the uber utility of business and life. It has shown the path.” “

Source: Mark Zuckerberg Wants Facebook to Emulate WeChat. Can It? – The New York Times

Posted in: China, Information Technology, Journalism, Media and Social Media

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How WhatsApp Pushes Mobs to Murder in India – By Vindu Goel, Suhasini Raj and Priyadarshini Ravichandran – NYT

By Vindu Goel, Suhasini Raj and Priyadarshini Ravichandran July 18, 2018

In India, false rumors about child kidnappers have gone viral on WhatsApp, prompting fearful mobs to kill two dozen innocent people since April. One of the first to be killed was a 65-year-old woman named Rukmani. She and four family members were driving to a temple in the southern state of Tamil Nadu in May. A mob on this road mistook them for “child lifters” and assaulted them.

Source: How WhatsApp Pushes Mobs to Murder in India – The New York Times

I came to breakfast, and read about the EU fining Google 5.5 Billion dollars for using the Android OS for phones to force sellers and customers into Google search and apps. I need more information, and don’t understand it clearly.

I thought about posting to my Facebook page, that we should copy the EU, and make a $50 Million dollar fine for companies like facebook, if they don’t identify and take down fake news within 24 hours. The EU passed such a law this spring, and voila, facebook set up a 2000 person emergency center in Germany, which takes down all fake news inside of 24 hours.
We should follow the EU in regulating facebook, and possibly google, et cetera.
Then, I get to the story below, about WhatsApp abuse in India leading to mobs killing innocent neighbors. Guess who owns WhatsApp. Facebook. They should have to pay costs and penalites for crimes of neglect, carelessness and recklessness. They started making obvious improvements overnight. I don’t want to quit facebook, I want strong goverment regulations to protect the public from themselves and Russian trolls, bots and hackers.

Posted in: India, Journalism, Media and Social Media, Law and Order

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Vietnam says Facebook commits to preventing offensive content – Reuters

“HANOI (Reuters) – Vietnam’s government said Facebook has committed to work with it to prevent content that violates the country’s laws from appearing on its platform.In February, communist Vietnam complained about “toxic” anti-government and offensive content on Facebook and Google Inc.’s YouTube and pressured local companies to withdraw advertising until the social media firms found a solution.Facebook’s commitment came during a meeting between its Head of Global Policy Management Monika Bickert and Vietnamese information and communication minister Truong Minh Tuan in Hanoi on Wednesday, a statement on the government’s website said.

“Facebook will set up a separate channel to directly coordinate with Vietnam’s communication and information ministry to prioritize requests from the ministry and other competent authorities in the country,” the statement said.

The firm will also remove fake accounts and fake content about senior government officials, it said.A Facebook representative said the company had a clear and consistent process for governments to report illegal content.”

Source: Vietnam says Facebook commits to preventing offensive content

 

If the Vietnamese can get Facebook to police fake news, why can

we do the same in the United States?

Posted in: Journalism, Media and Social Media

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Facebook Navigates an Internet Fractured by Governmental Controls – The New York Times

“On a muggy, late spring evening, Tuan Pham awoke to the police storming his house in Hanoi, Vietnam. They marched him to a police station and made their demand: Hand over your Facebook password. Mr. Tuan, a computer engineer, had recently written a poem on the social network called “Mother’s Lullaby,” which criticized how the communist country was run. One line read, “One century has passed, we are still poor and hungry, do you ask why?”

Mr. Tuan’s arrest came just weeks after Facebook offered a major olive branch to Vietnam’s government. Facebook’s head of global policy management, Monika Bickert, met with a top Vietnamese official in April and pledged to remove information from the social network that violated the country’s laws.

While Facebook said its policies in Vietnam have not changed, and it has a consistent process for governments to report illegal content, the Vietnamese government was specific. The social network, they have said, had agreed to help create a new communications channel with the government to prioritize Hanoi’s requests and remove what the regime considered inaccurate posts about senior leaders.”

Source: Facebook Navigates an Internet Fractured by Governmental Controls – The New York Times

David Lindsay

Hamden, CT

Very interesting article: thank you. I have questions. If we start to use messaging on Facebook, or Messenger, is there any known abuse of customers by Facebook’s collecting of our marketing preference, to target ads, outside of their accepting fake news ads and posts, and allowing the targeting of political groups, or demographic groups, with fake news and politically sensitive lies. What is Facebook doing about these Fake News issues, and how Facebook was used by the Russians and perhaps some Republicans, to corrupt the last presidential election? What could Federal regulators do, that they aren’t doing yet?

David blogs at InconvenientNews.wordpress.com

Posted in: Journalism, Media and Social Media

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