Environment

Red Flags for Forced Labor Found in China’s Car Battery Supply Chain

Ties to potentially coercive labor practices could prove a problem for an industry that is heavily dependent on China, once a new law barring Xinjiang products goes into effect. By Ana Swanson and Chris Buckley June 20, 2022Updated 8:11 a.m. ET “The photograph on the mining conglomerate’s social media account showed 70 ethnic Uyghur workers standing at attention under …

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These Revered Cranes Escaped Extinction. Can They Survive Without Humans?

Conservators vastly increased the numbers of red-crowned cranes, a symbol of loyalty and longevity in Japanese culture. That’s just a start. By Motoko Rich and Hikari Hida Photographs by James Whitlow DelanoMarch 21, 2022. “KUSHIRO, Japan — The dance of the red-crowned cranes commenced, an impromptu pas de deux. The pair approached each other with a bow. They crossed …

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Beijing Wanted the Winter Olympics. All It Needed Was Snow.

The environmentally unfriendly secret of winter sports is that many competitions take place on artificial snow. China’s water-scarce capital had to go to enormous lengths to make enough of it. By Matthew Futterman and Raymond ZhongPublished Feb. 5, 2022Updated Feb. 6, 2022阅读简体中文版閱讀繁體中文版Leer en español “BEIJING — China did not move mountains to host the 2022 Winter Olympics. But it flooded a …

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China’s Births Hit Historic Low, a Political Problem for Beijing

The demographic crisis, a challenge to the economy, also signals a limit to the reach of the government, which has struggled recently to grow the population. By Steven Lee Myers and Alexandra StevensonJan. 17, 202, “China announced on Monday that its birthrate plummeted for a fifth straight year in 2021, moving the world’s most populous country closer to …

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RACE TO THE FUTURE

Why a Chinese Company Dominates Electric Car Batteries Beijing gave CATL lavish subsidies, a captive market of buyers and soft regulatory treatment, helping it to control a crucial technology of the future. CATL’s headquarters, shaped like an oversize lithium battery, in Ningde, China.Credit…Qilai Shen for The New York Times By Keith Bradsher and Michael Forsythe Dec. 22, 2021,  …

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Inside the Campaign to Save an Imperiled Cambodian Rainforest

Deep in the Southern Cardamom Mountains, former loggers and poachers have assumed new roles as protective rangers and ecotourism guides. Can their efforts help preserve a vast stretch of wilderness? Photographs and Text by Francesco Lastrucci Dec. 20, 2021, 5:00 a.m. ET At the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, with travel restrictions in place worldwide, we launched …

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The U.S. and China Should Compete on Electric Cars

Dec. 8, 2021 By Deborah Seligsohn Ms. Seligsohn is an assistant professor in the political science department at Villanova University. “If you are in the market for an electric vehicle today, there’s a good chance you’ll buy a Tesla. Fast forward a couple of years, and this may no longer be true. Traditional automakers like General …

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Race to the Future: What to Know About the Frantic Quest for Cobalt

A New York Times investigation examines the global demand for raw materials as the clean energy revolution takes off. This is what we found. By Eric Lipton, Dionne Searcey and Michael ForsytheNov. 20, 2021Updated 12:09 p.m. ET The clean energy revolution is replacing oil and gas with a new global force: the minerals and metals needed in electric car batteries, …

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China “will not build new coal-fired power projects abroad.”

“President Xi Jinping of China told the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday that his country would stop promoting the growth of the world’s dirtiest fossil fuel overseas, in a major step to address climate change: China, he said, “will not build new coal-fired power projects abroad.” Mr. Xi’s announcement, in prerecorded remarks, was a surprise move …

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As China Boomed, It Didn’t Take Climate Change Into Account. Now It Must.

China’s breathtaking economic growth created cities ill-equipped to face extreme weather. Last week’s dramatic floods showed that much will have to change. By Steven Lee Myers, Keith Bradsher and Chris BuckleyPublished July 26, 2021Updated July 29, 2021阅读简体中文版閱讀繁體中文版 “China’s breakneck growth over the last four decades erected soaring cities where there had been hamlets and farmland. The cities lured factories, and the …

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