Asia Development Bank Report on Climate Change in Asia

 

“The historic Paris Agreement of 2015 has acknowledged that the global climate crisis is arguably the greatest challenge
human civilization faces in the 21st century. In this context, the role of the Asia and Pacific region is characterized
by a double dichotomy that entails simultaneously high risks and significant opportunities. Proper analysis guided
by adequate information can result in investment and policy choices that will continue to promote sustainable economic
development and eradicate poverty in the region.
The first dichotomy relates to the region accounting for an increasing overall share of global emissions of greenhouse
gases (GHGs) harming not only the world but the region itself. At the same time however, countries of the region have
the unprecedented opportunity to break the GHG-intensive development path by rapidly modifying the historical
model of industrial development. The rapidly decreasing costs of wind and solar power generation clearly indicates that
consumption and production of the future could be driven by renewable energy sources, though the when and where of
this great transition remain uncertain.
The second dichotomy pertains to the already observed and anticipated future impacts of anthropogenic global warming.
On the one hand, the rapid economic and human development of the region renders societies less vulnerable to the familiar
vagaries of the environment—such as heat waves, heavy precipitation or tropical cyclones. In particular, the shift away from
agriculture as the core sector guaranteeing livelihoods and the associated economic diversification of the countries of the
region help to increase resilience to weather extremes such as those experienced historically. Simultaneously however,
the same developments have opened up new avenues of exposure and vulnerability. Coastal populations and assets are
highly at risk from projected rises in sea level and the intensification of extreme weather events. Urbanized populations
are exposed to heat stress hazards. National and increasingly integrated regional economic systems are vulnerable to
disruptions in supply chain networks. Populations are migrating away from areas where climate change impacts represent
an increasing threat.
These rapidly emerging new climate vulnerabilities in the Asia and Pacific region need to be addressed with a portfolio
of strategies involving capacity building, preparedness programs, urban and rural planning, national and social security
schemes, proactive migration and numerous others. Crucial preconditions for success are whole-systems and long-term
thinking and planning, based on the best available data, analysis, and modeling.”

Posted in: Climate Change Remediation

Leave a Comment (0) →

The City of My Birth in India Is Becoming a Climate Casualty. It Didn’t Have to Be. – By Somini Sengupta – NYT

“KOLKATA, India — I wanted to glimpse the future in the city where I was born. So, this summer I returned to India for a firsthand look at the way climate change is affecting Kolkata.

I spent the first seven years of my life in this delta city, close to where the Ganges pours into the sea. In my memory, it was a city of steam and sweat, rice and fish, of languid, muggy afternoons. A city of water. Lots and lots of water.

On this trip, in the era of global warming, I found a city at profound risk.”

Source: The City of My Birth in India Is Becoming a Climate Casualty. It Didn’t Have to Be. – The New York Times

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Europe and Asia Move to Bolster Global Systems That Trump Has Attacked – By Steven Erlanger and Jane Perlez – NYT

 July 18, 2018 134 查看本文简体中文版查看本文繁體中文版

BRUSSELS — From trade to regulation to security, America’s traditional allies are accelerating their efforts to buttress a global system that President Trump has seemed prepared to tear down.

After months of stunned indecision, they have undertaken a flurry of efforts intended to preserve the rules-based order the United States created after World War II and championed ever since.

The most obvious example came on Monday, the same day a stunned world watched Mr. Trump praise President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia as a competitor after having dismissed Europe as an economic “foe.” A few thousand miles away, in Beijing, the leaders of the European Union and China held a long-scheduled meeting of their own.

In the past, expectations for such meetings were low, given the conflicts on trade and human rights between the Europeans and the Chinese. But while those differences remain, this summit meeting produced an unusual joint declaration and a common commitment to keep the global system strong.

The next day, the Europeans traveled to Japan and signed the biggest free-trade agreement in history, just the sort of deal the Trump administration has criticized.

And on Wednesday, Europe’s top regulator announced a $5.1 billion fine against Google, another strong indication that Brussels is not just fighting to maintain the rules-based trading order, but is also positioning itself as the watchdog of that system.

After months of denialangerbargaining and depression, Europe and other parts of the world have accepted that Mr. Trump and his mission of disruption are not going away.”

Source: Europe and Asia Move to Bolster Global Systems That Trump Has Attacked – The New York Times

Posted in: China, Globalization and Trade, Japan

Leave a Comment (0) →

How WhatsApp Pushes Mobs to Murder in India – By Vindu Goel, Suhasini Raj and Priyadarshini Ravichandran – NYT

By Vindu Goel, Suhasini Raj and Priyadarshini Ravichandran July 18, 2018

In India, false rumors about child kidnappers have gone viral on WhatsApp, prompting fearful mobs to kill two dozen innocent people since April. One of the first to be killed was a 65-year-old woman named Rukmani. She and four family members were driving to a temple in the southern state of Tamil Nadu in May. A mob on this road mistook them for “child lifters” and assaulted them.

Source: How WhatsApp Pushes Mobs to Murder in India – The New York Times

I came to breakfast, and read about the EU fining Google 5.5 Billion dollars for using the Android OS for phones to force sellers and customers into Google search and apps. I need more information, and don’t understand it clearly.

I thought about posting to my Facebook page, that we should copy the EU, and make a $50 Million dollar fine for companies like facebook, if they don’t identify and take down fake news within 24 hours. The EU passed such a law this spring, and voila, facebook set up a 2000 person emergency center in Germany, which takes down all fake news inside of 24 hours.
We should follow the EU in regulating facebook, and possibly google, et cetera.
Then, I get to the story below, about WhatsApp abuse in India leading to mobs killing innocent neighbors. Guess who owns WhatsApp. Facebook. They should have to pay costs and penalites for crimes of neglect, carelessness and recklessness. They started making obvious improvements overnight. I don’t want to quit facebook, I want strong goverment regulations to protect the public from themselves and Russian trolls, bots and hackers.

Posted in: India, Journalism, Media and Social Media, Law and Order

Leave a Comment (0) →

China’s Taste for Soybeans Is a Weak Spot in the Trade War With Trump – By Raymond Zhong – NYT

XIAOWUSILI, China — For all its economic might, China hasn’t been able to solve a crucial problem.

Soybeans. It just can’t grow enough of them.

 

That could blunt the impact of one of the biggest weapons the country wields in a trade fight with the United States.

Beijing placed a 25 percent tariff on American soybeans last week in retaliation for the Trump administration’s levies on Chinese-made goods. Last year, soy growers in the United States sold nearly one-third of their harvest to China. In dollar terms, only airplanes are a more significant American export to China, the world’s second-largest economy.

Source: China’s Taste for Soybeans Is a Weak Spot in the Trade War With Trump – The New York TimesMay

 

David Lindsay:  Maybe. Here are the three most recommended comments, that doubt some of what this article says:

Kathy Chenault
Rockville, Maryland

Although you say U.S. soybean producers “could take a hit,” you fail to realize they already have been hurt deeply and they suffer more each day this ruinous trade manipulation continues. Farmers need to be selling significant percentages of expected production throughout the growing season on futures contracts. This usually begins even before they have planted their crops in the spring. I grew up on a family farm in Nebraska and still am involved in its operations. (Each year, about half of our acres are planted in soybeans.) Commodity prices already were trapped in a low cycle before Trump’s disastrous trade moves. Farmers know how to deal with the usual ebb and flow that comes with such a long-range economic pursuit like farming. But then came the trade war that Trump says he wanted. Farmers now face these perilous conditions: Rising interest rates, decreasing land values because of falling commodity prices, and higher equipment costs and operating expenses because of other non-farm tariff threats by Trump. Our foreign grain markets, including but not limited to China, have taken decades to develop. All that work is being undone daily by Trump. The short-sighted focus of your story fails to take that into account — just as it appears the Trump administration has failed to truly understand the very nature of our farm economy or how rural America is affected by his actions. Shame.

donald.richards commented July 9

donald.richards
Terre Haute

Monsanto grows plenty of soybeans in Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay. I’m sure they won’t have any problem wiping out more of the rain forest to meet Chinese demand.

And when they do more American farmers can apply for food stamps. They might want to reconsider that work requirement for eligibility though.

Ruralist commented July 9

Ruralist
Upstate

The article seems to assume that the rest of the world produces no soybeans, but that is far from true. The biggest of the other exporters in Brazil. In fact, Brazilian farmers saw this coming and started expanding their plantings earlier this year.
They are also buying US soybeans at the great discount the trade war creates ($7.80), and selling them to other customers at the Brazil price ($10).

The competition is smart and well-informed.

 

 

 

Posted in: Agriculture, China, Trade and Trade Policy

Leave a Comment (0) →

As Vote Nears- Cambodia’s Leader Has Opponents- but No Competition – By Julia Wallace – NYT

By Julia Wallace

“PHNOM PENH, Cambodia — It’s election season in Cambodia, and the fireflies are out.

Cambodians use that term — “ampil ampik,” in the Khmer language — to refer to little-known political parties that flash onto the scene shortly before an election, then fade back into obscurity.

Twenty parties, some just a few months old, will be on the ballot when national elections are held this month. But most voters will have heard of only one: the Cambodian People’s Party, led by Hun Sen, the authoritarian prime minister.

Mr. Hun Sen has had no viable opposition since November, when the Cambodia National Rescue Party — which almost won the 2013 election — was dissolved by a court packed with his loyalists. The United Nations special rapporteur on Cambodia, Rhona Smith, and numerous rights groups have said the July 29 vote will not be legitimate.

In response, the government points to such obscure entities as the Dharmacracy Party, the Khmer Will Party and the New Light Party (whose platform is to promote “Cambodia’s natural, linguistic and alphabetical wonders”).

“If you have only one political party, you cannot say ‘multiparty,’ but we have 20 political parties,” said Dim Sovannarom, a spokesman for the National Election Committee.

Mr. Hun Sen, who has been in power since 1985, is clearly concerned that Cambodians will see it differently. In May, he warned against using the terms “fireflies” or “disembodied ghosts,” another figure of speech sometimes applied to minor parties.”

Source: As Vote Nears, Cambodia’s Leader Has Opponents, but No Competition – The New York Times

David Lindsay Jr.
Hamden, CT | Pending Approval
Excellent reporting by Julia Wallace, thank you. She wrote: “The leaders of the Cambodia National Rescue Party, or C.N.R.P., have been jailed or driven into exile, and lower-ranking members were harassed into joining Mr. Hun Sen’s party or getting out of politics. Mr. Hun Sen has also overseen a crackdown on the press. The United States and the European Union, which have helped fund past Cambodian elections, refused this year, saying that the vote will not be credible.” What a sorry picture, and a sorry mess. Unfortunately, the United States contributed to this mess, in ways that I am not qualified to list, but include our bombing of the country, and probably assassinating its leaders, even their good ones, just because they were communist. Is there a good book to cover the modern devastation of this once proud and vibrant country?
David Lindsay Jr. is the author of “The Tay Son Rebellion, Historical Fiction of Eighteenth-century Vietnam,” and blogs at TheTaySonRebellion.com and InconvenientNewsWorldwide.wordpress.com

Posted in: Bullies and Scoundrels, Cambodia, David Lindsay

Leave a Comment (0) →

Thailand Cave Rescue: Live Updates as All 13 Are Free After Weeks of Ordeal – The New York Times

“All of the young members of the Wild Boars soccer team and their 25-year-old coach have been rescued from Tham Luang Cave, the Thai Navy confirmed around 6:50 p.m.

• Four more people have yet to leave the cave — the Thai military personnel, including a doctor, who stayed with the team in their remote cavern in recent days. [Go here to read a Q. and A. about the details of the diving rescue operation by the Times reporter John Ismay, a former U.S. Navy diver.]

• The boys and their coach are to spend at least a week in a hospital in Chiang Rai Province, in hopes of warding off possible infection, doctors say. [Go here to read about the medical condition of the boys.]”

Source: Thailand Cave Rescue: Live Updates as All 13 Are Free After Weeks of Ordeal – The New York Times

Posted in: Thailand

Leave a Comment (0) →

In a High-Stakes Environmental Whodunit, Many Clues Point to China – NYT

Just now

About this article
x
x
David Lindsay:  Yes, thank you for this story. It makes me sick and heartbroken. I have endorsed the one comment now at the NYT:
Judith Nelson
Manhattan

The Montreal protocol, which banned chlorofluorocarbons, was a significant landmark and the efforts against climate change. Together with the Clean Air Act of 1970 and requirements for improving gas mileage for American cars, these were early proof that laws CAN be passed for the good of the environment. Unfortunately, market forces and lack of regulation are now undermining the CFC ban, and the Trump administration wants to roll back or eliminate mileage requirements and other EPA rules.
What’s needed is tough international enforcement of existing laws, and a return to sanity in the US government regarding the environment. We worked hard to clean things up, once; surely we can find the political strength and will to do it again.

Posted in: China, Climate Change Polluters

Leave a Comment (0) →

Where a Taboo Is Leading to the Deaths of Young Girls – Nepal – The New York Times

By Jeffrey Gettleman June 19, 2018

“TURMAKHAND, Nepal — Not long ago, in rural western Nepal, Gauri Kumari Bayak was the spark of her village. Her strong voice echoed across the fields as she husked corn. When she walked down the road at a brisk clip, off to lead classes on birth control, many admired her self-confidence.

But last January, Ms. Bayak’s lifeless body was carried up the hill, a stream of mourners bawling behind her. Her remains were burned, her dresses given away. The little hut where she was pressured to sequester herself during her menstrual period — and where she died — was smashed apart, erasing the last mark of another young life lost to a deadly superstition.

“I still can’t believe she’s not alive,” said Dambar Budha, her father-in-law, full of regret, sitting on a rock, staring off into the hills.

In this corner of Nepal, deep in the Himalayas, women are banished from their homes every month when they get their period. They are considered polluted, even toxic, and an oppressive regime has evolved around this taboo, including the construction of a separate hut for menstruating women to sleep in. Some of the spaces are as tiny as a closet, walls made of mud or rock, basically menstruation foxholes. Ms. Bayak died from smoke inhalation in hers as she tried to keep warm by a small fire in the bitter Himalayan winter.”

Source: Where a Taboo Is Leading to the Deaths of Young Girls – The New York Times

David Lindsay:  I spent a month in Nepal, hiking around the Annapurnas. I had no idea that this was part of the culture I witnessed and visited.  Here are the top comments from the NYT that I recommended:

Carla
Brooklyn Times Pick

Curious the deep seated hatred of women and bodily functions, just as prevelant in western culture from the dark ages, to the Victorian era and now in 2018 where republicans are busy trying to defund women’s health clinics and outlawing abortion and birth control.
Misogyny exists in every culture and I think if boils down to men’s fear of female power given that they procreate. I can’t think of any other reason,

Phyliss Dalmatian commented June 19

Phyliss Dalmatian
Wichita, Kansas

Before anyone comments about a primitive culture, how is this different from the GOP trying their hardest to control Women’s reproductive lives, and health, in THIS Country ??? Just an updated version.

Maura Driscoll commented June 19

Maura Driscoll
California   Times Pick

As long as women and girls are considered “extra mouths to feed”, unwanted burdens on families that only value sons, oppression, forced marriages, underage marriages and condoned rape will continue. The ignorance of those who promote menstrual sequestration is astounding. It is not fear of blood, it’s FEAR of WOMEN and the power of procreation that upsets oppressors world wide. And it’s up to those very women, mothers, aunts, grandmothers, to say NO. (And it crosses my mind that the males in the household are perhaps the ones who should go live in the huts if they are so afraid…)

Posted in: Civil Rights, Nepal, Women's Issues

Leave a Comment (0) →
Page 1 of 16 12345...»