Archive for October, 2017

The Internet turns 20 in Vietnam: P2 – Australian professor’s contribution – Tuoi Tre News (Vietnam)

The Internet turns 20 in Vietnam: P2 – Australian professor’s contribution

“In the late 1980s and early 1990s, students at ANU would use a mainframe computer for statistical work and related tasks. The personal computer, which was not powerful enough to perform such tasks then, was mostly used to type documents and send emails. Prof. Hurle shared his disturbance at learning that overseas Vietnamese students had limited use of personal computers, preventing them from putting what they had learnt in Australia into practice upon their return to their home country.

The nagging question prompted him to travel to Vietnam in 1991.

“I brought with me a hefty modem and gifted it to Pham Bich San, one of the Vietnamese students in Australia, so that he and others could connect to the mainframe computers in Vietnam more easily,” the professor recalled.

“Totally uninformed about Vietnam, I had not been aware that the bulky modem would be a burden, as computer engineers in Vietnam, who earned a mere US$20 per month, could hardly afford phone calls from Vietnam to Australia at $5 per minute,” he added.

This reality encouraged the scientist to devise ways to connect to Vietnam through an international phone toll of $2 per minute, which engineers in Australia, whose monthly salaries were approximately $3,500, could afford.

A few months later, Prof. Hurle returned to Vietnam and contacted an overseas Vietnamese in the U.S., who suggested that he approach Tran Ba Thai from the Institute of Information Technology in Hanoi.

“By then we had made strides in substituting the mainframe system with smaller yet higher-configuration computers adopting the UNIX system [a family of multitasking, multiuser computer operating systems] at ANU,” he added.

Prof. Hurle, Thai and a few other colleagues then embarked on experiments in connecting computers in Vietnam and Australia through landline phone lines.

The Aussie designed new pieces of software for the UNIX system, so that modems could be utilized to link computers in Vietnam by allowing users access to the UNIX system before they could connect to the Internet.

The experiments were a success.”

Source: The Internet turns 20 in Vietnam: P2 – Australian professor’s contribution – Tuoi Tre News

Posted in: Australia, Post War Advances in Vietnam

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China Enshrines ‘Xi Jinping Thought.’ What Does That Mean? – by Chris Buckley – NYT

“What do these changes really mean?

A key phrase here is “new era,” one that Mr. Xi has used throughout the congress, which began last week. Mr. Xi has described Chinese history since 1949 as divided into two eras: the three decades after Mao seized power in a revolution that established a unified People’s Republic and ended nearly a century of civil war and foreign invasions, and the three decades after Deng took power in 1978 and refocused China on developing its economy.

Mr. Xi has signaled he is launching China into a new, third era. In his report to the congress, Mr. Xi suggested that if Mao made China independent, and Deng made it prosperous, he would make it strong again. Restoring China to greatness is a central message of “Xi Jinping Thought,” and a goal that has already guided Mr. Xi’s policies of building up the military, strengthening domestic controls and raising China’s profile in global affairs.”

Source: China Enshrines ‘Xi Jinping Thought.’ What Does That Mean? – The New York Times

Posted in: China

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How Mao Molded Communism to Create a New China – by Roderick MacFarquhar – NYT

“Toward the end of his life, dying of Lou Gehrig’s disease, Mao Zedong claimed two achievements: leading the Communist revolution to victory and starting the Cultural Revolution. By pinpointing these episodes, he had underlined the lifelong contradiction in his attitudes toward revolution and state power. Mao molded Communism to fit his two personas. To use Chinese parlance, he was both a tiger and a monkey king. For the Chinese, the tiger is the king of the jungle. Translated into human terms, a tiger

Source: How Mao Molded Communism to Create a New China – The New York Times

 

David Lindsay

Hamden, CT

Very interesting piece and comments. I tend to agree with the Chinese gentleman, who dislikes the use of the Monkey King to describe the political purges of Mao, but not entirely. I recently studied the Monkey King, or Monkey, because it is considered one of the four great novels of Chinese literature. I was delighted by the book, which is full of farce, comedy, slapstick and political satire. The Monkey King is a folk hero from stories of old China. He has super powers, and is more like a Marvel or DC superhero, a very naughty one, than any kind of political genius.

Professor Roderick MacFarquhar points out that Mao himself wrote that he was inspired by Sun Wukong, the Monkey King. That the story seems to be an entertainment for children, doesn’t change the fact that the book has many levels of meaning, especially in its covert attack on the Emperor of China, and stuck up officials of all stripes. Out of reverence for this amazing story, I crafted a synopsis of the book into one of the chapters of my first book The Tay Son Rebellion, Historical Fiction of Eighteen-Century Vietnam.

Posted in: China, Fiction and Folklore

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Fraud Scandals Sap China’s Dream of Becoming a Science Superpower – by Amy Qin – NYT

“BEIJING — Having conquered world markets and challenged American political and military leadership, China has set its sights on becoming a global powerhouse in a different field: scientific research. It now has more laboratory scientists than any other country, outspends the entire European Union on research and development, and produces more scientific articles than any other nation except the United States.

But in its rush to dominance, China has stood out in another, less boastful way. Since 2012, the country has retracted more scientific papers because of faked peer reviews than all other countries and territories put together, according to Retraction Watch, a blog that tracks and seeks to publicize retractions of research papers.

Now, a recent string of high-profile scandals over questionable or discredited research has driven home the point in China that to become a scientific superpower, it must first overcome a festering problem of systemic fraud.”

“In Tumor Biology’s case, government investigators found that many of the authors had submitted the names of real researchers, but with fabricated email addresses. This apparently allowed the authors, or more often writers hired by the authors, to pose as academic peers, and write positive reviews that would help get their own papers published.

According to an investigation led by the country’s Ministry of Science and Technology, Chinese researchers used such methods to manipulate the peer-review process in 101 out of the 107 retracted articles. In many cases, government investigators said authors had gone online to hire people to write professional-sounding reviews.

A recent search revealed a teeming, illicit trade in faked peer reviews. A search for the term “help publishing papers” on Taobao, a popular Chinese e-commerce site, yielded a long list of sellers who offered services ranging from faked peer reviews to entire scientific papers already written and ready to submit. Depending on the service, they charge from a few hundred dollars up to $10,000.”

Source: Fraud Scandals Sap China’s Dream of Becoming a Science Superpower – The New York Times

Posted in: China

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Xi Jinping Presses Military Overhaul- and Two Generals Disappear – The New York Times

BEIJING — He was one of China’s most prominent commanders, with hopes of rising higher. So when Gen. Fang Fenghui disappeared from public view, it sent a clear warning to the top leaders of the People’s Liberation Army: President Xi Jinping was not done shaking up their once-unassailable ranks. General Fang, the chief of the army’s Joint Staff Department, was not the only military leader to fall ahead of next week’s Communist Party congress. Gen. Zhang Yang, the director of the military’s political depar

Source: Xi Jinping Presses Military Overhaul, and Two Generals Disappear – The New York Times

David Linday commented to this article at the NYT:

Very interesting article, thank you.
I recently posted to my On Vietnam blog, an article titled: Japan to provide patrol ships to Vietnam amid maritime row with China | Thanh Nien Daily.
Japan has just sent five coast guard gun boats to Vietnam, and other aid, to help them contain China in the South China Sea. Japan is also giving military aid to the Philippines and other ASEAN nations. It would be useful in containing China if the US reached out to Vietnam as well. Since 937 AD, the Vietnamese have repulsed the Chinese advance on Southeast Asia at least eight times successfully. A modern Chinese military will pose a very grave threat to the independence of Vietnam and its neighbors.

10/12:  My comment above has only 4 recommends at the NYT comments. Socrates is far more popular, and he writes about how over militarized we are, which is serious issue. I felt complellled to endorse his comment:

Socrates

is a trusted commenter Verona NJ 21 hours ago

“China’s military spending, officially $144 billion in 2016, still lags far behind the more than $600 billion spent last year by the United States.”

 

China also has four times as many people – 1.3 billion – as the United States – 320 million people.

The United States spends about $2,000 per person versus a global country average of $200 per person.

China spends less on military than most other countries on both a per capita basis ($89) and as a percent of Chinese GDP (2.1%).

Other sources indicate the United States spends about $700 Billion on military expenses or about 43% of the world’s military expenditures.

America’s military expenditure per capita ($2,240) and its percent of American GDP spent on military (4.8%) are much higher than most other countries in the world.

Meanwhile, China has world-class high-speed rail and and a blossoming alternative energy and technology market.

And the USA has collapsing roads, rails, bridges, IQs and is bringing back coal.

We have met the enemy, and it’s the American military-industrial-right-wing-petro-state hawking Guns, Gas and Greed.

The Chinese are not America’s major threat.

Grand Old Poison is.

26 Recommended

While this next post appears to correct Socrates, it seems to add a different ratio, than the one he gave above.

The link does confirm the writers ratio:

Nancy

is a trusted commenter Great Neck 15 hours ago

http://www.bea.gov/iTable/iTableHtml.cfm?reqid=9&step=3&isuri=1&…

January 15, 2017

Defense spending was 59.2% of federal government consumption and
investment in 2016. *

$728.9 / $1,231.5 = 59.2%

[ United States defense spending in 2016 was $728.9 billion. ]

 

Posted in: China

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Japan to provide patrol ships to Vietnam amid maritime row with China | Thanh Nien Daily

An aerial view shows Japan Coast Guard patrol ship, fishing boats from Taiwan and Taiwan’s Coast Guard vessel sailing side by side near the disputed islands in the East China Sea, known as Senkaku in Japan, Diaoyu in China and Tiaoyutai in Taiwan, in this photo taken by Kyodo in this file photo dated September 25, 2012.

RELATED NEWS Japan to provide planes, ships for Philippines amid sea dispute with China Japan eyes record defence budget to develop anti-ship missiles Japan protests after Chinese navy ship sails near disputed islands Japan pledges support for Southeast Asia security to counter coercive China Japan considers providing new ships to Vietnam’s coast guard.

The Japanese government said on Wednesday it is ready to provide Vietnam with new patrol ships, in its latest step to boost the maritime law-enforcement capabilities of countries locked in territorial rows with China.On Tuesday, Japan agreed to provide two large patrol ships and lend up to five used surveillance aircraft to the Philippines, another country at odds with China over sovereignty issues in the South China Sea.Japan itself has been at loggerheads with China over a group of tiny, uninhabited East China Sea islets.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told his Vietnamese counterpart, Nguyen Xuan Phuc, of Tokyo’s intention in their meeting on the sidelines of ASEAN-related meetings in Vientiane.Japan has already provided six patrol ships to Vietnam, but they were all used ones, a Japanese foreign ministry official said, adding that details such as the timing of the delivery and the number of ships to be provided have yet to be fixed.Japan plans to extend a low-interest loan under its official development assistance program to Vietnam to facilitate the acquisition.”

Source: Japan to provide patrol ships to Vietnam amid maritime row with China | Politics | Thanh Nien Daily

Posted in: Japan, Vietnamese Foreign Policy

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VN should strengthen migrant labor protections: World Bank – VietNam News

Workers installing new rail lines. Construction is one of the sectors receiving the most migrant workers across ASEAN. – VNA/VNS Photo: Công PhongViet Nam News

SINGAPORE – With labour migration on the rise across ASEAN, countries like Việt Nam, which sends a large number of workers abroad and relies on remittances for 7 per cent of its GDP, should strengthen protections for workers while lowering barriers to their mobility, argues a new World Bank report released yesterday in Singapore.The report, “Migrating to Opportunity”, highlights the importance of migrant workers to the region as a whole: ASEAN countries received US$62 billion in remittances in 2015. It also articulates challenges faced by ASEAN migrant workers, focusing on barriers to their mobility. The report concludes that removing barriers for skilled workers and decreasing obstacles for all workers would increase ASEAN worker welfare by 14 and 12 per cent respectively.

Labour migration rose significantly between 1995 and 2015, with Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand becoming the regional migration hubs. The significant differences in wages among ASEAN countries create opportunities for workers to earn more money when they cross the borders. Migration usually increases the salaries in receiving countries, which benefits both migrant workers and local ones.But migrant workers are often vulnerable, and policies across the region do little to address their needs. According to UN data, 80 per cent of intra-ASEAN migrants are low-skilled and many of them are undocumented. Contruction, plantation and domestic services are the sectors that receive most of migrant workers.

Current challenges facing migrant workers include lack of protections for migrant workers, high recruitment costs at recruitment centers, costly and lengthy migration procedures, migration quotas and domestic employment policies that prevent workers from easily changing jobs.Since migrant workers often find themselves at the mercy of recruitment agencies that promise to find them jobs abroad, Việt Nam needs to better regulate labour export companies to protect the rights of workers. The report also recommends that it consider a national migration strategy to guide reforms.”

Source: VN should strengthen migrant labor protections: World Bank – Society – Vietnam News | Politics, Business, Economy, Society, Life, Sports – VietNam News

Posted in: News and current events from Vietnam, Vietnam's Neighbors

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Việt Nam- Singapore hold 8th defence policy dialogue – VietNam News

Deputy Minister of National Defence Senior Lieutenant General Nguyễn Chí Vịnh and Singaporean Permanent Secretary for Defence Chan Yeng Kit co-chaired the 8th Việt Nam-Singapore Defence Policy Dialogue in Hà Nội yesterday.– Photo vovworld.vn

“HÀ NỘI – Deputy Minister of National Defence Senior Lieutenant General Nguyễn Chí Vịnh and Singaporean Permanent Secretary for Defence Chan Yeng Kit co-chaired the 8th Việt Nam-Singapore Defence Policy Dialogue in Hà Nội yesterday. The two sides exchanged views on security issues in the Asia-Pacific region and reviewed recent cooperation between the two countries’ armed forces. Both sides agreed that the bilateral defence partnership has made good progress with positive results in terms of exchange visits, dialogue mechanisms, consultation, training, army medicine, maritime security, and search and rescue.

Both sides agreed to further enhance defence cooperation in the future to match the strategic partnership between the two countries. They will continue maintaining defence policy dialogues at deputy minister level, the main pillar of the two nations’ defence cooperation, to discuss strategic issues and develop cooperation plans for strengthening ties. They will also support each other at multilateral forums and work to heighten ASEAN’s central role in regional security architectures.”

Source: Việt Nam, Singapore hold 8th defence policy dialogue – Politics & Laws – Vietnam News | Politics, Business, Economy, Society, Life, Sports – VietNam News

 

David Lindsay:  I need sources for more detail about the problems that were discussed, especially the encroachment of China in the South China Sea.

Posted in: Vietnamese Foreign Policy

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1st elephant baby in Đắk Lắk in 20 years is stillborn – VietNam News

Ban Nang was the first domesticated elephant in Đắk Lắk Province to become pregnant during the past 20 years. — Photo vietnamnet.vn

Viet Nam NewsĐắk Lắk — The first domesticated elephant in the Central Highlands province of Đắk Lắk to become pregnant in 20 years delivered a stillborn calf last Sunday, the Elephant Conservation Centre has reported.The male baby weighed around 90kg.The 38-year-old mother, Ban Nang, had gone into labour but did not deliver for long, veterinarians at the centre said.The animal is owned by Y Mứ Bkrông of M’Liêng village, Liên Sơn town.Huỳnh Trung Luân, director of the centre, said veterinarians had gone into the forest every day to check on the creature and foreign experts too had been on the job.Ban Nang had been released into the forest when it was six months pregnant so that it could give birth in the wild, he said.But the delivery had possibly been difficult because Ban Nang was too old and the centre’s veterinarians had no experience in caring for pregnant elephants, he said.

Source: 1st elephant baby in Đắk Lắk in 20 years is stillborn – Society – Vietnam News | Politics, Business, Economy, Society, Life, Sports – VietNam News

Posted in: News and current events from Vietnam, Wildlife and Nature

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